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Italy

Venice

Day 1.

In a water taxi into the city we see Venice ahead of us, luring us forward. We are like children at a birthday party, desperately eager to find out what presents and fun she will give to us.

Red, yellow and orange and crumbling bricks, palaces, hotels and homes. The sound of Italian voices, tourists and beauty everywhere.

We threw ourselves into Venice, marveled at her streets, passages, dead ends and bridges, her squares, wine drinkers, her crumbling and impossibly floating streets cut by hundreds of canals. Vivaldi, the expression of history, art, the gelato. It’s almost too much!

We’re in the air

And we don’t care

We’re on our way to Venice

On the ground

We’ll get around

By boat, and skip in Venice

The bustling town

Won’t let us down

For there shall be no menace

It’s food and drink

And wine and fish

As we explore dear Venice

Day 2.

Canals and passageways. The Doges Palace. We continued to explore this amazing place. The first leader of Venice was elected, we haven’t discovered what happened to the last Doge. I read that when Vivaldi lived here and taught music to orphaned and illegitimate girls that there were 150,000 Venetians in the city. One third of them lived lives of pleasure. This has been a city of pleasure for a very long time.

The corridors of Venice

Have an air of menace

These tiny streets

That wind and weave are really hard to conceive

The walls lean in

The passages narrow

The men they move about with barrows

It’s like a dream

And lost you’ll be

Of this there is no doubt

But surely there’s

No other place

That I would be without

Day 3.

The pleasure continues. In a lift we zoomed up to the top of the bell tower in St Mark’s Square. This is the place where Galileo demonstrated his new-fangled telescope to the wonder of the Venetian merchants.

Next, we visited an 18th century palazzio “Ca Rezzonico” that is now a museum filled with art, painted ceilings, porcelain, marbles, frescoes and the faces of ancient Venice that looked back at us from all the art. Lots of naked women were represented, but unexpectedly also some naked men drawn by a rare female 18th century artist.

Our day ended with opera; we saw Madame Butterfly in a wonderful opera house where we could imagine many tourists to Venice were entertained over the centuries.

It’s goodbye to thee

And sad indeed

That we must leave behind

The place that kept us warm at night

That lost us in its labyrinth streets

That floated us on canals of dreams

That saw us climb its tower so high

T’is truly sad indeed

That this’s the day we say goodbye

Until next time we meet


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